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Izvestia/Baltica Cup

Year

Champion

GP

W

L

T

GF

GA

PTS

1967

USSR 1

5

4

1

0

28

7

8

1968

USSR 1

3

3

0

0

16

4

6

1969

USSR

5

4

0

1

25

10

9

1970

Czechoslovakia

4

4

0

0

23

7

8

1971

USSR

3

2

1

0

19

7

4

1972

USSR

4

4

0

0

34

10

8

1973

USSR

4

4

0

0

32

5

8

1974

Czechoslovakia

18

14

3

1

84

37

29

1975

USSR

3

3

0

0

14

7

6

1976

USSR

4

4

0

0

22

11

8

1977

Czechoslovakia

4

3

0

1

19

9

7

1978

USSR

4

3

0

1

22

7

7

1979

USSR

4

4

0

0

19

8

8

1980

USSR

3

2

1

0

16

5

4

1981

USSR

3

3

0

0

9

5

6

1982

USSR

4

4

0

0

26

13

8

1983

USSR

4

4

0

0

28

7

8

1984

USSR

4

4

0

0

29

1

8

1985

Czechoslovakia

4

2

1

1

14

7

6

1986

USSR

4

3

1

0

14

4

6

1987

Canada

5

4

1

0

13

9

8

1988

USSR

4

4

0

0

21

4

8

1989

USSR

5

4

1

0

28

8

8

1990

USSR

4

3

0

1

19

5

7

1992

Russia 2

3

3

0

0

14

5

6

1993

Russia 1

4

2

0

2

12

7

6

1994

Russia

3

2

0

1

17

5

5

1995

Russia

4

3

0

1

14

9

6

1996

Sweden

4

3

0

1

14

6

7

1997

Czech Republic

3

1

0

2

17

11

4


So Close, Yet So Far
This ceramic tea pot was given to Team Canada for finishing in second place to the Soviets during the 1986 Izvestia tournament. This tied their best ever finish in 1967.

Snowman
The tournament has always been represented by a distinctive cartoon snowman.


Enough Is Enough
Clock trophy received by the victorious Canadian National Team upon winning their first and only Izvestia Cup tournament in 1987. This was the first time in the tournament's 21 year history that a team other than the Soviets or Czechoslovakians had won gold.

At first it looked like the USSR was on its way to another Izvestia Tournament victory. But with Sean Burke playing spectacularly, the Soviets led only 2-1 after two periods. In the third period diminutive centre Ken Berry, tied the score in the fourth minute and scored the winner in a 3-2 Canadian victory five minutes later. It was the first time a Canadian team had beaten a Soviet opponent in Moscow since Sept. 28, 1972 when Paul Henderson scored his famous goal to win the Summit series. Canada still had to defeat West Germany and Finland to clinch the gold medal. Ken Yaremchuk was the hero against the West Germans, scoring the winning goal in a 2-1 victory with just six minutes left in the game. Finland fell 4-1 to Canada on the final day of competition. At the end of the game the happy Canadian players skated around the huge Luzhniki Arena ice surface displaying the Canadian flag as Soviet fans looked on in disbelief.

Martinec Helps Trounce Soviets
It was the worst defeat the Soviet Union had ever been handed at the Luzhniki Sports Palace in Moscow. Czechoslovakia took a 5-0 lead after two periods and trounced the Soviets 8-3 on their way to an upset victory in the 1977 Izvestia Cup. Vladimir Martinec scored twice for the Czechoslovaks and Jiri Holecek provided solid goaltending. The game took place in the third round and, because they had been tied 3-3 by Finland in the first round, the Czechoslovaks stood in second place behind Sweden. However, the Swedes lost to both Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union. This gave the Czechoslovaks a chance to clinch the Cup by downing Canada, represented by the WHA champion Quebec Nordiques 6-2 on the final day. Both Peter and Marian Stastny, who would later star with the Nordiques, scored in that game. The Nordiques tied Finland 6-6 for their only point in the tournament.

Soviets Power Through 1984
The Soviets had dominated the Izvestia Tournament since its inception, but they were particularly strong in 1984, outscoring their four opponents 29-1. Along the way they shut out Sweden 10-0, West Germany 6-0 and Czechoslovakia 5-0, and also trounced Finland 8-1. But it was great teamwork, not individual play, which led to their success. Sixteen different players scored goals in the tournament and only one - Sergei Makarov - averaged a goal a game. To prove their dominance in European hockey, at the end of the tournament the Soviets defeated a team of all-stars, which included five players from each of the other four teams, 7-3. During the tournament, three of the greatest players in Soviet hockey history - Vladislav Tretiak, Valery Vasiliev and Alexander Maltsev - received special recognition due to their recent retirement.


Jets
The NHLís Winnipeg Jets competed for Canada at the 1976 Izvestia tournament. The team finished fourth with a 1-2-1 record.

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Summary