Legends of Hockey -- NHL Player Search -- Player -- Kenny Wharram
Forward Ken Wharram provided speed, consistency and an exemplary work ethic during an NHL career spent entirely with the Chicago Black Hawks, where he was best known as the fleetest member of the potent Scooter Line with Stan Mikita and Ab McDonald.

Initially, Wharram struggled to gain a place in the Chicago lineup. After playing briefly with the Quebec Aces of the QHL, he was traded by the Hawks to the AHL's Buffalo Bisons, where he completed four productive years and was heavily influenced by coach Harry Watson. Chicago reacquired him in May 1958. Beginning in 1958-59, he earned a permanent roster position that lasted 11 seasons. He started out trying to forge an identity on the fourth line with the likes of Danny Lewicki and Lorne Ferguson.

Wharram soon proved to be the perfect complement to the Hawks' gifted young center Stan Mikita. He was lightning-quick and masters of timing his move at the opposition blueline so that he seldom caused an offside. Once a Mikita pass found him, his puck control was among the best in the business. The two became fast friends off the ice and roomed together on road trips, often discussing strategy.

The first edition of the Scooter Line featured Wharram and Mikita with Ted Lindsay. When the latter moved on after one year, Ab McDonald was brought in to play left wing. When McDonald went to the Bruins, Doug Mohns was added in his place because of his ability to dig out the puck, score and play solid defensive hockey. Since Wharram weighed only 160 pounds, his speed, agility and on ice smarts proved to be his ticket to survival in the rough and tumble NHL.

In September 1969 Wharram was coming off his seventh straight 20-goal season. One day after a morning workout he experienced severe chest pains when he tried to remove his skates. He soon found himself in the intensive care unit diagnosed with myocarditis, a virus that attacks the muscles of the heart with symptoms similar to a coronary. His condition worsened to the point that he had to start from scratch building up the ability to stay awake through a normal day. This whole process took several weeks, and in the end there was no question that he was finished as a hockey player. His heart recovered to the point where he could lead a normal life but not put his body through the sudden exertion that takes place in hockey. He made his retirement official prior to the opening of the Hawks' training camp in September 1970.


REGULAR SEASON PLAYOFFS
Season Club League GP G A TP PIM +/- GP G A TP PIM
1949-50 North Bay Black Hawks EOHL 2 0 1 1 0
1950-51 Galt Black Hawks OHA-Jr. 53 35 38 73 28 3 2 3 5 2
1951-52 Galt Black Hawks OHA-Jr. 45 35 79 114 37
1951-52 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1952-53 Galt Black Hawks OHA-Jr. 54 34 40 74 42 11 9 14 23 2
1953-54 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 29 1 7 8 8
1953-54 Quebec Aces QHL 29 7 10 17 8
1954-55 Buffalo Bisons AHL 63 33 49 82 15 10 9 7 16 4
1955-56 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 3 0 0 0 0
1955-56 Buffalo Bisons AHL 59 27 63 90 27 5 4 2 6 2
1956-57 Buffalo Bisons AHL 64 28 49 77 18
1957-58 Buffalo Bisons AHL 58 31 26 57 14
1958-59 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 66 10 9 19 14 6 0 2 2 2
1959-60 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 59 14 11 25 16 4 1 1 2 0
1960-61 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 64 16 29 45 12 12 3 5 8 12
1961-62 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 62 14 23 37 24 12 3 4 7 8
1962-63 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 55 20 18 38 17 6 1 5 6 0
1963-64 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 39 32 71 18 7 2 2 4 6
1964-65 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 68 24 20 44 27 12 2 3 5 4
1965-66 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 69 26 17 43 28 6 1 0 1 4
1966-67 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 31 34 65 21 6 2 2 4 2
1967-68 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 74 27 42 69 18 -2 9 1 3 4 0
1968-69 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 76 30 39 69 19 +18
NHL Totals 766 252 281 533 222 80 16 27 43 38


AHL Second All-Star Team (1955)
NHL First All-Star Team (1964, 1967)
Lady Byng Trophy (1964) Played in NHL All-Star Game (1961, 1968)
Traded to Buffalo (AHL) by Chicago for cash, August, 1956. Traded to Chicago by Buffalo (AHL) for Wally Hergesheimer and Frank Martin, May 5, 1958.
Suffered career-ending heart attack during training camp, September 18, 1969.
Surname(s) beginning with