Legends of Hockey -- NHL Player Search -- Player -- Doug Risebrough
Doug Risebrough first entered a hockey radar screen with the Guelph Biltmores of the Southern Ontario Junior Hockey League. In 1972-73, he led his team to a national title and won the league's scoring championship with 107 points in 60 games.

The Kitchener Rangers of the OHA came calling and signed him for one season in 1974-75. Risebrough was up to the task, making his solid, two-way game known to scouts from the NHL. The Montreal Canadiens picked him up at the end of the year and placed him with the Nova Scotia Voyageurs of the AHL. But early in the campaign, Henri Richard suffered a career-ending broken ankle, thus opening up a spot at centre.

Risbrough was there to answer the call. He formed a unit with Yvon Lambert and Mario Tremblay known as "The Kid Line." Their job was to harass opposing forwards, a job they executed with great effectiveness. Risebrough was especially good at playing the agitator. He was a chippy, hard-nosed, aggressive pest known for his two-handers and ability to pot his share of points. He once threw an Edmonton Oilers sweater on the ice and shredded it with his skates.

During his eight seasons with the Habs, Risebrough enjoyed four Stanley Cup victories. In 1982, however, he began a new chapter in his career when he was traded to the Calgary Flames. He continued to play his fiery brand of hockey for an additional five seasons before hanging up his blades in 1987.

He then stepped behind the Flames' bench as an assistant coach in time for the club's Stanley Cup victory in 1989. The following year, he was named the team's head coach. His tenure was brief, however, as a need surfaced for a GM. Risebrough was rushed into the position in 1991. His inexperience is said to be at the root of the Flames' fall from that point forward. The Leafs in what is now known as the infamous Doug Gilmour trade fleeced him. As well, he failed to re-sign stars such as Joe Nieuwendyk and Robert Reichel. As a result, the Flames never got beyond the quarterfinals during any of the years leading up to Risebrough's dismissal in 1995.


REGULAR SEASON PLAYOFFS
Season Club League GP G A TP PIM +/- GP G A TP PIM
1971-72 Guelph CMCs ON-Jr.A 56 19 33 52 127
1972-73 Guelph CMC Biltmore Mad Hatters ON-Jr.A 60 47 60 107 229
1973-74 Kitchener Rangers OHA-Jr. 46 25 27 52 114
1974-75 Montreal Canadiens NHL 64 15 32 47 198 +27 11 3 5 8 37
1974-75 Nova Scotia Voyageurs AHL 7 5 4 9 55
1975-76 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 16 28 44 180 +18 13 0 3 3 30
1976-77 Montreal Canadiens NHL 78 22 38 60 132 +33 12 2 3 5 16
1977-78 Montreal Canadiens NHL 72 18 23 41 97 +30 15 2 2 4 17
1978-79 Montreal Canadiens NHL 48 10 15 25 62 +22 15 1 6 7 32
1979-80 Montreal Canadiens NHL 44 8 10 18 81 -2
1980-81 Montreal Canadiens NHL 48 13 21 34 93 +7 3 1 0 1 0
1981-82 Montreal Canadiens NHL 59 15 18 33 116 +23 5 2 1 3 11
1982-83 Calgary Flames NHL 71 21 37 58 138 +13 9 1 3 4 18
1983-84 Calgary Flames NHL 77 23 28 51 161 +11 11 2 1 3 25
1984-85 Calgary Flames NHL 15 7 5 12 49 +10 4 0 3 3 12
1985-86 Calgary Flames NHL 62 15 28 43 169 +22 22 7 9 16 38
1986-87 Calgary Flames NHL 22 2 3 5 66 -2 4 0 1 1 2
NHL Totals 740 185 286 471 1542 124 21 37 58 238


Traded to Calgary by Montreal with Montreal's 2nd round pick (later traded to Minnesota - Minnesota selected Frantisek Musil) in 1983 NHL Draft for Washington's 2nd round pick (previously acquired, Montreal selected Todd Francis) in 1983 NHL Draft and Calgary's 3rd round pick (Graeme Bonar) in 1984 NHL Draft, September 11, 1982.
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