Legends of Hockey -- NHL Player Search -- Player -- J.P. Parise
For most of his career in hockey, J.P Parise was an underrated player who took pride in the aspects of the game that had less to do with the score sheet and everything to do with digging pucks out of the corners. He was a smallish winger who made up for his shortness with a deceptive strength that he channeled, in its full force, onto the bodies of his opponents as he consistently out-dueled them for loose pucks.

Parise first gained fame with the Niagara Falls Flyers of the OHA in 1961-62. Under the strict and disciplined guise of coach Hap Emms, he learned to play the NHL way, up and down his wing in solid, two-way fashion.

During those days, the robust winger entertained little hope of cracking the NHL's tiny echelon of players at the top. Nonetheless, he remained steadfastly committed to his game of bulling, pushing, forcing mistakes, and outworking his opponents.

Parise turned pro in 1962 and embarked on a lengthy stint on the fringe of the NHL. Over the six seasons that followed, he picked up a handful of games with the Bruins and Leafs, but otherwise spent most of his time in the EPHL, CHL, and AHL.

While toiling with the Rochester Americans in December 1967, the big-league doors swung wide open as his rights were secured by the Minnesota North Stars. In Minneapolis, Parise found the perfect venue for his defensively sound, two-way game. He became known as the four-wheeled drive of the Stars' attack. He joined Jude Drouin and Bill Goldsworthy on a line that brought credibility to the club's attack up front.

Over the next seven-and-a-half years, Parise hustled as a popular but unsung type who carried his pick, shovel and lunch pail to work each night to dig for pucks and to score clutch goals from time to time.

His working-class anonymity quickly dissolved, however, when he was selected as a checking specialist for Team Canada during the Summit Series of 1972. He joined Wayne Cashman and Phil Esposito as the designated corner man assigned to feed pucks to goal-crease resident Esposito.

Parise remained in the thick of the battle right up until the fourth minute of game seven. At that time, he laid a check on Russian forward Alexander Maltsev. Maltsev had just passed the puck a split second before Parise made contact. The referee called Parise for an interference penalty. The winger was incensed with the call and used harsh language to reinforce his point. A 10-minute misconduct followed that raised Parise's ire to a full-flamed conflagration. He raised his stick up to shoulder height, skated towards the referee and made a believable swing that appeared en route to decapitate the started official who must have been momentarily absorbed in his final prayers. Parise, however, still in control of his intentions, stopped the stick just inches shy of the referee's quivering head. The gesture brought on Parise's expulsion from the game. He felt badly for having lost his cool, but speculates that his actions put enough fear into the officials that from that point until the Canadians completed the series, there were no more questionable calls made against Team Canada.

In 1975, Parise was traded to the New York Islanders where he played his usual game of hustle and dig for about three seasons before winding his career down with brief stints in Cleveland and again in Minnesota.

He hung up his bladed for keeps in 1979, to work as the Stars' assistant coach for a number of years.


REGULAR SEASON PLAYOFFS
Season Club League GP G A TP PIM +/- GP G A TP PIM
1961-62 Niagara Falls Flyers OHA-Jr. 38 8 20 28 28
1961-62 Kingston Frontenacs EPHL 1 0 0 0 0
1962-63 Kingston Frontenacs EPHL 64 11 17 28 64 5 0 0 0 6
1963-64 Minneapolis Bruins CPHL 72 27 36 63 77 5 1 2 3 10
1964-65 Minneapolis Bruins CPHL 70 17 56 73 106 5 5 1 6 0
1965-66 Boston Bruins NHL 3 0 0 0 0
1965-66 Oklahoma City Blazers CPHL 69 19 30 49 137 7 6 3 9 2
1966-67 Boston Bruins NHL 18 2 2 4 10
1966-67 Oklahoma City Blazers CPHL 42 11 22 33 98 11 1 9 10 32
1967-68 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 1 0 1 1 0 0
1967-68 Rochester Americans AHL 30 10 18 28 37
1967-68 Minnesota North Stars NHL 43 11 16 27 27 -10 14 2 5 7 10
1968-69 Minnesota North Stars NHL 76 22 27 49 57 -44
1969-70 Minnesota North Stars NHL 74 24 48 72 72 -3 6 3 2 5 2
1970-71 Minnesota North Stars NHL 73 11 23 34 60 -15 12 3 3 6 22
1971-72 Minnesota North Stars NHL 71 19 18 37 70 +10 7 3 3 6 6
1972-73 Canada Summit-72 6 2 2 4 28
1972-73 Minnesota North Stars NHL 78 27 48 75 96 +18 6 0 0 0 9
1973-74 Minnesota North Stars NHL 78 18 37 55 42 -8
1974-75 Minnesota North Stars NHL 38 9 16 25 40 -18
1974-75 New York Islanders NHL 41 14 16 30 22 +10 17 8 8 16 22
1975-76 New York Islanders NHL 80 22 35 57 80 +12 13 4 6 10 10
1976-77 New York Islanders NHL 80 25 31 56 46 +26 11 4 4 8 6
1977-78 New York Islanders NHL 39 12 16 28 12 +19
1977-78 Cleveland Barons NHL 40 9 13 22 27 -15
1978-79 Minnesota North Stars NHL 57 13 9 22 45 -12
NHL Totals 890 238 356 594 706 86 27 31 58 87


CPHL Second All-Star Team (1966) Played in NHL All-Star Game (1970, 1973) Claimed by California (Oakland) from Boston in Expansion Draft, June 6, 1967. Traded to Toronto (Rochester-AHL) by Oakland with Bryan Hextall Jr. for Gerry Ehman, October 12, 1967. Traded to Minnesota by Toronto (Rochester-AHL) with Milan Marcetta for Murray Hall, Ted Taylor, Len Lunde, Don Johns, Duke Harris and the loan of Carl Wetzel, December 23, 1967. Traded to NY Islanders by Minnesota for Doug Rombough and Ernie Hicke, January 5, 1975. Traded to Cleveland by NY Islanders with Jean Potvin for Wayne Merrick, Darcy Regier and Cleveland's 4th round choice (draft choice cancelled by the Cleveland-Minnesota merger) in 1978 Amateur Draft, January 10, 1978. Placed on Minnesota Reserve List after Cleveland-Minnesota Dispersal Draft, June 5, 1978.