Legends of Hockey -- NHL Player Search -- Player -- Rob Ray
Away from the arena, Rob Ray has a giant heart that he puts to work tirelessly on behalf of Children's Hospital, the Make-A-Wish program, and the Rosewell Park Cancer Institute. As acknowledgement for his efforts, he was awarded the King Clancy Memorial Trophy for leadership and humanitarian contributions to the community in 1999.

But somehow, when Ray laces up for a game of hockey, he is able to transform his beneficent self into an adversarial ball of flailing knuckles. While playing junior hockey for the Cornwall Royals of the OHL, he could duke with the best of the league while not losing sight of the ultimate goal: to score points and win games.

But once he joined the Buffalo Sabres in 1989-90, he shifted his focus from the latter to concentrate almost exclusively on his game of intimidation. Among NHL toughs, Ray has become one of the more colourful and creative fighters whose mouth and hands are rarely idle during a game.

By the mid-1990s, he fell into controversy when he rigged his sweater and equipment to tear away at the slightest adversarial tug from a potential combatant. Once his upper body was cleared of things to hold on to, Ray was free to tie up his unwitting opponent and overpower his opponents. Eventually, the league legislated Ray's uniform back onto his body where it now usually remains while he fights.

Over his 14 seasons as a Sabres forward, Ray endeared himself with his fans and made plenty of enemies. He accomplished both by playing with great emotional intensity and a fearless commitment to enforcement. He has twice led the league in penalty minutes doled out for a single season. He is also the NHL's all-time penalty-minute leader with one team.

In 2002-03 Ray's tenure with the Sabres came to an end as he was traded to the Ottawa Senators towards the late stages of the season. After joining the Senators for the remainder of the 2002-03 season, Ray stepped down from the game until the Senators offered him a contract shortly after the 2004 NHL All-Star Game.


REGULAR SEASON PLAYOFFS
Season Club League GP G A TP PIM +/- GP G A TP PIM
1983-84 Trenton Bobcats ON-Jr.B 40 11 10 21 57
1984-85 Whitby Lawmen ON-Jr.A 35 5 10 15 318
1985-86 Cornwall Royals OHL 53 6 13 19 253 6 0 0 0 26
1986-87 Cornwall Royals OHL 46 17 20 37 158 5 1 1 2 16
1987-88 Cornwall Royals OHL 61 11 41 52 179 11 2 3 5 33
1988-89 Rochester Americans AHL 74 11 18 29 446
1989-90 Buffalo Sabres NHL 27 2 1 3 99 -2
1989-90 Rochester Americans AHL 43 2 13 15 335 17 1 3 4 115
1990-91 Buffalo Sabres NHL 66 8 8 16 350 -11 6 1 1 2 56
1990-91 Rochester Americans AHL 8 1 1 2 15
1991-92 Buffalo Sabres NHL 63 5 3 8 354 -9 7 0 0 0 2
1992-93 Buffalo Sabres NHL 68 3 2 5 211 -3
1993-94 Buffalo Sabres NHL 82 3 4 7 274 +2 7 1 0 1 43
1994-95 Buffalo Sabres NHL 47 0 3 3 173 -4 5 0 0 0 14
1995-96 Buffalo Sabres NHL 71 3 6 9 287 -8
1996-97 Buffalo Sabres NHL 82 7 3 10 286 +3 12 0 1 1 28
1997-98 Buffalo Sabres NHL 63 2 4 6 234 +2 10 0 0 0 24
1998-99 Buffalo Sabres NHL 76 0 4 4 261 -2 5 1 0 1 0
1999-00 Buffalo Sabres NHL 69 1 3 4 158 0
2000-01 Buffalo Sabres NHL 63 4 6 10 210 +2 3 0 0 0 2
2001-02 Buffalo Sabres NHL 71 2 3 5 200 -3
2002-03 Buffalo Sabres NHL 41 0 0 0 92 -5
2002-03 Ottawa Senators NHL 5 0 0 0 4 0
2003-04 Ottawa Senators NHL 6 1 0 1 14 0
2003-04 Binghamton Senators AHL 5 2 0 2 11 -1
NHL Totals 900 41 50 91 3207 55 3 2 5 169


NHL Foundation Player Award (1999) King Clancy Memorial Trophy (1999) Traded to Ottawa by Buffalo for future considerations, March 10, 2003. Re-signed as a free agent by Ottawa, February 13, 2004.
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